~~ Massachusetts Colony ~~

--- Fifth Generation in America ---

 

Families of the Children of Edward4 Washburn and Elisabeth Richmond

 

 

            It appears that only two of the five children of Edward Washburn and Elisabeth Richmond left descendants. Edward, the eldest son, had 3 children, but only his eldest son had descendants, while Amos, the youngest son, had a large number of children who reached adulthood, but only one son who had descendants, most of the others apparently choosing not to marry.

 

 

 

 

John2 Washburn (5th)

 

 

James3 Washburn

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth2 Mitchell

 

Edward4 Washburn

 

 

 

 

Mary Bowden

 

Abigail Washburn

 

 

 

James Washburn

 

 

 

Edward5 Washburn (Jr.)

 

 

 

Abial5 Washburn

 

 

 

Capt. Amos5 Washburn

 

 

 

 

 

 

John2 Richmond (Jr.)

 

 

Ebenezer3 Richmond

 

 

 

 

Abigail3 Rogers

 

 Elisabeth4 Richmond

 

 

 

 

 

Robert1 Sprout

 

 

Anna2 Sprout

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth2 Samson

 

 

(673.) Edward5 Washburn (Jr.), second son of (173) Edward4 Washburn, (65) James3, (43) John2 (5th), (28) John1 (4th); born in Middleborough, MA, on 17 June 1734,[1] married 1.) Phebe Smith in ca. 1759.[2] Her parents have not yet been discovered. She died by 1765, and he remar­ried to 2.) Hannah Jones, of Middleborough, on 29 Oct. 1765 in Middleborough.[3] She was probably born on ca. 20 Mar. 1745.[4]

         Edward Washburn (Jr.) died intestate in 1766 in Middleborough, and administra­tion of his estate granted to his father, Edward Washburn, Sr., on 25 Mar. 1767. His inventory was taken on 12 June 1767 by Thomas Nelson and Ezra Clarke.[5] The two children of Edward Washburn (Jr.), were placed under the guardianship of their grandfather, Edward Washburn (Sr.), with Elkanah Elmes and Ebenezer Wood, Jr., as sureties, on 10 Dec. 1766.[6] Hannah (Jones) Washburn probably remarried to Joshua Waterman, son of Joseph and Patience (Barrow) Waterman,[7] of Middleborough, as his second wife, on 8 Mar. 1774 in Middleborough.[8] He was born on 16 Mar. 1737/8 in Middleborough,[9] and had married first to Bethiah Reed, of Middleborough, on 27 Dec. 1764 in Middleborough.[10] Joshua Waterman died testate on 27 Aug. 1801 in Middleborough, aged 63 years,[11] his will dated 16 Jan. 1797, and probated on 9 Nov. 1801, mentioned his wife Hannah, whom he appointed as his executrix, daughter Patience Cobb, wife of Isaac Cobb, daughter Bethiah Waterman, and three sons Joshua Waterman, Joseph Waterman, and Jonah Waterman.[12] (See Appendix [A] for a full transcription of his will.) Hannah Waterman died a widow on 1 June 1808 in Middleborough, aged 63 years, 2 months, 12 days.[13]

         Edward Washburn (Jr.) had 2 children by Phebe Smith, and evidently 1 son by Hannah Jones:

        1886     i   Abigail6 Washburn, born on 21 Sept. 1760 in Middleborough,[14] was placed under the guardianship of her grandfather, Edward Washburn, when her father died in 1766,[15] and she was baptized on 25 Oct. 1767 in Lakeville or Taunton, MA.[16] She married John Perkins, Jr., possibly son of John and Patience5 (Paddock) Perkins (Jr.), of Middleborough,[17] possibly as his second wife, on 9 Jan. 1777, probably in Lakeville, MA.[18] He was born on 26 Dec. 1748 in Middlebor­ough,[19] a grandson of John and Mercy (Jackson) Perkins,[20] and of Ichabod4 and Joanna3 (Faunce) Paddock,[21] and had possibly married first to Hannah Gardner, of Middleborough, on 28 Aug. 1772 in Middleborough.[22] Children not found.[23] Abigail (Washburn) Perkins possibly died by 1788, and John Perkins remarried again to Anna Clark, of Middleborough, in 1788.[24] He may have been the John Perkins living in Middleborough, MA, in the 1790 federal census.[25] No death or probate records were found for him in Plymouth County.

+      1887    ii   Gen. Abiel6 Washburn, born on 13 Dec. 1762 in Middleborough,[26] was placed under the guardianship of his grandfather, Edward Washburn, when his father died in 1766,[27] and he was baptized on 25 Oct. 1767 in Lakeville or Taunton, MA.[28] He married Elisabeth “Betsy” Peirce, daughter of Capt. Job and Elisabeth (Rounseville?) Peirce,[29] on 6 Jan. 1788, probably in Lakeville, MA.[30] (To be continued in Washburn Sixth Generation.)

        1888   iii   Edward Washburn, born ca. 1766 in Middleborough, was named in the 1781 will of his grandfather, Edward Washburn, but no guardian was appointed for him after his father died, and he probably remained under the care of his mother. No further record found.

        Hannah Jones also had 5 more children by Joshua Waterman:

                  iv   Abner Waterman, born on 2 Dec. 1774 in Middleborough,[31] died on 18 July 1796 in Middleborough.[32]

                   v   Bethiah Waterman, born on 19 Sept. 1776 in Middleborough,[33] was still unmarried in 1797 when her father wrote his will, married Joseph Tinkham, of Winthrop, ME, on 26 May 1805 in Middleborough.[34]

                  vi   Joshua Waterman (Jr.), born on 20 Oct. 1778 in Middleborough,[35] married Sally Perkins, of Middleborough, on 6 Oct. 1805 in Middleborough.[36]

                 vii   Joseph Waterman, born on 24 Jan. 1781 in Middleborough,[37] married Sally Williams, of Raynham, in 1807.[38]

                viii   Jonah Waterman, born on 3 Jan. 1783 in Middleborough.[39]

 

 

(675.) Capt. Amos5 Washburn, youngest son of (173) Edward4 Washburn, (65) James3, (43) John2 (5th), (28) John1 (4th); born in Middleborough, MA, on 8 Apr. 1742,[40] mar­ried Pru­dence Haskins, daughter of Abial and Elizabeth5 (Richmond) Haskins, of Taunton,[41] in ca. 1763.[42] She was a granddaughter of William Haskins (3rd),[43] and of Capt. Edward4 and Elizabeth (Deane) Richmond (Jr.), all of Taunton.[44] The will of Capt. Edward Richmond, of Taunton, 13 Oct. 1767, mentioned his daughter Elizabeth Haskins, among others.[45]

         In Oct. 1767 Amos Washburne of Middleborough, husbandman, sued William Ashley of Freetown, yeoman, for a note dated 29 Apr. 1767 for 250 lbs of “good bloomery iron” worth £3.3s.4d.[46] On 30 Jan. 1772 Edward Washburn, of Middleborough, innholder, gave a deed of gift to his son Amos Washburn for 150 acres of land in Middleborough.[47] In April 1773 Joseph Russell and Barnabas Russell, both of Dartmouth, merchants, sued Jacob Tillson of Middleborough, trader, and Amos Washburne of Middleborough, Innholder, over a 6-month note for £117.10s.9d dated 18 Dec. 1770.[48] In April 1781 Amos Washburne of Middleborough, Gentleman, sued Jabez Carpenter of Rehoboth, yeoman, over a 1-month note for £9 dated 21 Aug. 1777.[49] In July 1786 the commissioners accused Amos Washburn, gentleman, of having detained David and John Hunt against their will,[50] in April 1791 John Smith III, Gentleman, sued Amos Washburn, Gentleman, for breaking into his farm and carrying away cedar, oak and pine rails valued at £4, and causing the destruction of hay and stalks,[51] and in August 1791 Amos Washburn and his sons Amos Washburn Junr. and Luther Washburn, all of Middleborough, were in court for assaulting Nathaniel Cole, and in August 1792 Amos Washburn countersued Nathaniel Cole, but lost.[52] In 1793 Amos Washburn was named as executor of his father Edward Washburn’s will, he was still alive in August 1794 when he reached an agreement with Timothy Wood, of Middleborough, regarding iron ore at Abiel’s furnace called Pope’s Point Furnace.[53]

         Capt. Amos Washburn was the Lieu­tenant of the First Company of local Militia in Middleborough before the Revolu­tionary War, responding to the Lexington alarm in April 1775, enlisted as a 1st Lieutenant in Capt. Abiel Pierce’s Company in 1776, and was promoted to Captain of the 13th Company of the 4th Plymouth County Regiment, then Captain of the 7th Company from Lakeville, in which he served until 1780, during which time he came to the aid of New Bedford in Sept. 1778 against the British who were threatening the town. He was finally discharged on 9 Aug. 1780.[54] They lived in Middleborough, MA, where he was an innkeeper, but he was not a head of household in Massachusetts in the 1790 federal census.

         Amos Washburn, Gentleman, died intestate in about Oct. 1794 in Middleborough, and was buried in Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville, MA.[55] His widow, Prudence Washburn, petitioned that her eldest son, James Washburn, be granted administration of his estate, and James Washburn was granted administration of the estate of Amos Washburn, late of Middleborough, Gentleman, on 24 Oct. 1794, with Uriah Samson and Hugh Montgomery as sureties.[56] His inventory was taken on 20 Jan. 1795 by Hugh Mont­gomery and Uriah Sampson, yeomen, and Abraham Shaw, Jr., Gentleman, all of Middleborough, and totaled £1238.3.6, including his homestead farm in Middleborough containing 145 acres valued at £796, a small farm lying in Titticut valued at £150, and a Pew in the Rev. Mr. Turner’s meeting house.[57] In August 1796 James Washburn, Gentleman, Amos Washburn, yeoman, Betsy, Lydia, Phebe and Olive Washburn, “single women and spinsters,” and Luther, Joshua and Prudence Washburn. “infants under the age of 21 years,” sued Lemuel Briggs, of Middleborough, yeoman, to recover 8 acres of land in Middleborough that had belonged to their father, Amos Washburn, late of Middleborough.[58] On 26 Nov. 1799 James Washburn, Amos Washburn, and Luther Washburn, yeomen, sold land in Middleborough to Gamaliel Samson and Lazarus Samson, of Middleborough, that had been set off to said James Washburn as adminis­trator of the estate of Amos Washburn.[59] Prudence (Haskins) Washburn died a widow on 30 Oct. 1804 in Lakeville, MA,[60] and was buried in Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville.[61]

         Amos Washburn and Prudence Haskins had chil­dren:[62]

        1889     i   Betty/Betsey6 Washburn, born on 3 Dec. 1763 in Middleborough,[63] never married, died on 12 Apr. 1845 in Middleborough, aged 82 years, and was buried in Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville,[64] but no probate records were filed for her estate, and she was not a head of household in Massachusetts in the 1790 federal census.

        1890    ii   Lydia6 Washburn, born on 25 Feb. 1765 in Middleborough,[65] died on 4 July 1799 in Middleborough, aged 34 years,[66] unmarried, but no probate records were filed for her estate.

        1891   iii   James6 Washburn, Esq., born in 1767, never married. He graduated from Harvard University as an attorney in 1789,[67] and was appointed as admin­istrator of his father’s estate on 24 Oct. 1794,[68] but he was not a head of household in Middleborough, MA, in the 1790 federal census either. He was a lawyer, a Justice of the Peace, representative to the General Court, and was appointed as the first Postmaster of Middleborough, in 1804, by President John Adams. On 23 Nov. 1801 David Perkins, of Rochester, sold to James Washburn, of Middleborough, Gentleman, his share of his mother Fear (Canedy) Perkins’ estate in Taunton, witnessed by Luther Washburn and Joshua Washburn.[69] In 1811 he moved to New Bedford, and was elected to the U. S. House of Representatives. James Washburn, Esq., died intestate on 18 Nov. 1815,[70] pos­sessed of land in Plymouth and Bristol Counties, and was buried in Middlebor­ough. His broth­er, Amos Washburn (Jr.), was granted administration of his estate in 1815, which was found insolvent, and was settled finally in 1818.[71]

        1892   iv   Phebe6 Washburn, born ca. 1769,[72] never married, died on 26 Aug. 1844 in Middleborough, aged 75 years,[73] but no probate records were found for her.

        1893    v   Olive6 Washburn, born ca. 1772,[74] never married, died on 30 July 1847 in Middleborough, aged 75 years,[75] but no probate records were found for her.

        1894   vi   Amos6 Washburn (Jr.), Esq., born in 1774,[76] died on 4 Aug. 1853 in Lakeville, MA,[77] and was buried in Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville,[78] but neither marriage, children, nor probate records were found for him in Plym­outh County. He was administrator of the estate of his brother, James Washburn, in 1815, but he was not found in the 1790, 1810 or 1820 federal censuses in Plymouth County. He was living in Middleborough, MA, next door to his brother Luther Washburn in the 1830,[79] and 1840 federal censuses, where he was a farmer,[80] and he was still living in Middleborough in the 1850 federal census, where his sister Prudence, and his brother, Luther Washburn’s family were living in his house.[81]

+      1895  vii   Luther6 Washburn, born in 1777, married Hannah Foster Terry, of Middleborough, on 25 Dec. 1803, probably in Lakeville, MA.[82] (To be continued in Washburn Sixth Generation.)

        1896 viii   Joshua6 Washburn, born in ca. 1779,[83] died on 2 May 1818 in Middleborough, aged 39 years, presumably unmarried, but no probate records were found for him.

        1897   ix   Prudence6 Washburn, born in 1780,[84] never married, died on 28 Dec. 1868 in Lakeville, MA, aged 87 years, and was buried in Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville,[85] but no probate records were found for her in Plymouth County. She was living with her brothers, Amos and Luther Washburn in Middleborough in the 1850 federal census, but was not found in Middleborough in the 1855 state cen­sus.

 

 

{Back to Site Index}{Continued in Children of Moses Washburn and Hannah Cushman}

 

 

© 2011 John A. Maltby, Redwood City, California



        [1] Merrick, Barbara Lambert, and Alicia Crane Williams, Middleborough, Massachusetts, Vital Records, The Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants, Boston, Volume One: 1986, Volume Two: 1990, [hereinafter Middleborough VRs], Vol. 1, p. 69.

        [2] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, p. 55, marriage intentions recorded 1 Oct. 1759 in Middleborough; Fiske, Jane Fletcher, Robert Moody Sherman and Ruth Wilder Sherman, Mayflower Families Through Five Generations: Volume Twenty Part 2, Family of Henry Samson, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2005, [hereinafter MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2], p. 98, who does not identify the parents of Phebe Smith.

        [3] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 155, Vol. 2, p. 61, married by Rev. Ebenezer Hinds, Baptist Minister; MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 98, who does not identify the parents of Hannah Jones either.

        [4] Calculated from her age at death.

        [5] Plymouth County Probate Docket #21952; Vol. 17, p. 180; Vol. 19, p. 523.

        [6] Plymouth County Probate Docket #21915; Vol. 19, p. 407‑408.

        [7] Vital Records of Plympton, Massachusetts, To the Year 1850, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 1923, [hereinafter Plympton VRs], p. 420, the marriage intentions of Joseph Waterman and Patience Barrow, of Plympton, recorded on 14 Apr. 1733 in Plympton.

        [8] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, pp. 76, 144; MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 98.

        [9] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 24.

        [10] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 179, Vol. 2, p. 60.

        [11] Wood, Deacon Alfred, Record of Deaths, Middleboro, Massachusetts, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, Boston, 1947, [hereinafter Wood, Middleboro Deaths], p. 222; Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, p. 9, which gives the date as 28 Aug. 1801.

        [12] Plymouth Co. Probate Docket #22166, Vol. 37, p. 509-510, from FHL microfilm #0550719.

        [13] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, p. 13; Wood, Middleboro Deaths, p. 222, which gives the date as 2 June 1808.

        [14] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 138.

        [15] Plymouth County Probate Docket #21915; Vol. 19, p. 408. Elkanah Elmes and Ebenezer Wood Jr. were sureties on the bond of Edward Washburn, as guardian of Abigail Washburn, minor daughter of Edward Washburn Jr., late of Middleborough.

        [16] Vital Records of Taunton, Massachusetts, To the Year 1850, 3 Volumes, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 1929, [hereinafter Taunton VRs], Vol. 1, p. 436, from the Lakeville and Taunton Precinct Congregational Church records.

        [17] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, pp. 81, 88, the marriage of Mr. John Perkins and Mrs. Patience Paddock, both of this town, on 23 Oct. 1745 in Middleborough.

        [18] Taunton VRs, Vol. 2, p. 496, from the Lakeville and Taunton Precinct Congregational Church records; Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, pp. 82, 90, married by Rev. Caleb Turner.

        [19] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 98.

        [20] Plympton VRs, p. 359, the marriage of John Perkins and Marcy Jackson on 18 Apr. 1721 in Plympton; Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, reprint, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1994, originally published as Part II of Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth, Boston, 1899, [hereinafter Davis, Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families], p. 201.

        [21] Van Antwerp, Lee D., Vital Records of Plymouth, Massachusetts, to the year 1850, Picton Press, Camden, ME, 1993, [hereinafter Plymouth VRs], p. 90, the marriage of Ichabod Padduck and Joannah Faunce on 15 Oct. 1712 in Plymouth; Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 50, the birth of Patience Paddacke, daughter of Ichabod & Joanna Paddacke, on 2 Nov. 1727 in Middleborough.

        [22] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, pp. 72, 79, the marriage intentions calls her “Hannah Garner,” but the marriage record calls her “Hannah James;” Davis, Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, p. 201, which only gives the first wife of John Perkins, Hannah Gardner.

        [23] Davis, Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, p. 201, says that John Perkins (Jr.) and his wife Hannah Gardner had John, David Gardner, 1775, Gaius, Elisha Paddock, 1782, Patience, m. Stephen Taft of Woodstock, VT, James, Cyrus, Thomas, Joseph, 1795, Polly, m. Abner Buckman of Barnard, and Simeon, 1798. If Abigail Washburn became the second wife of John Perkins in 1777, and Anna Clark became his third wife in 1788, then certainly some of the children listed by Davis are Abigail Washburn’s, but none of the children given by Davis were recorded in the Middleborough vital records. MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 99, does not identify the John Perkins who married Abigail Washburn.

        [24] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, p. 111, marriage intentions recorded 16 Apr. 1788 in Middleborough.

        [25] Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790: Massachusetts, Bountiful, Utah, 1993, p. 174, Middleborough Town, Plymouth County, the John Perkins household had 1 free white male aged 16 or older and 3 free white females.

        [26] Calculated from his age at death.

        [27] Plymouth County Probate Docket #21915; Vol. 19, p. 407. Elkanah Elmes and Ebenezer Wood Jr. were sureties on the bond of Edward Washburn, as guardian of his grandson Abiel Washburn, minor son of Edward Washburn Jr., late of Middleborough.

        [28] Taunton VRs, Vol. 1, p. 436, from the Lakeville and Taunton Precinct Congregational Church records.

        [29] Thatcher, Charles M., “Thatcher Papers,” 3 Volumes, 1620-1899, manuscript from FHL microfilm #945019, [hereinafter Thatcher Papers], Vol. II: Peirce, however MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 99, identifies the wife of Capt. Job Peirce as Mary Hoskins.

        [30] Taunton VRs, Vol. 2, p. 496, from the Lakeville and Taunton Precinct Congregational Church records; Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, pp. 110, 147, married by Rev. Caleb Turner.

        [31] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 201.

        [32] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 267.

        [33] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 201.

        [34] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, pp. 174, 196.

        [35] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 201.

        [36] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, pp. 175, 196.

        [37] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 278.

        [38] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, p. 177, marriage intentions recorded on 4 Jan. 1807 in Middleborough.

        [39] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 278.

        [40] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 138.

        [41] Thatcher Papers, Vol. I: Haskins; MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 100.

        [42] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, p. 57, marriage intentions recorded 25 Dec. 1762 in Middleborough.

        [43] Thatcher Papers, Vol. I: Haskins.

        [44] MF5G: Rogers, Vol. 19, p. 200.

        [45] MF5G: Rogers, Vol. 19, p. 200, from Bristol County Probate Vol. 23, p. 46.

        [46] Plymouth County Court Records, Vol. 8, Court of Common Pleas, Session 13, p. 336.

        [47] Plymouth County Land Records, Vol. 63, p. 167.

        [48] Plymouth County Court Records, Vol. 9, Court of Common Pleas, Session 15, p. 8-9.

        [49] Plymouth County Court Records, Vol. 9, Court of Common Pleas, Session 15, p. 244.

        [50] MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 100.

        [51] MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 100.

        [52] MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 101.

        [53] MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 101.

        [54] Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War, 17 Volumes, Boston, Vol. XVI, p. 657-658; MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 100.

        [55] Email of Diana M. Fisher, 2000, cemetery transcriptions from Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville.

        [56] Plymouth County Probate Docket #21921, Vol. 34, p. 15, from FHL microfilm #0550718.

        [57] Plymouth County Probate, Vol. 35, p. 216-217, from FHL microfilm #0550718.

        [58] MF5G: Samson, Pt. 2, p. 102. Zephaniah Briggs, of Middleborough, in the November 1796 court testified that Amos Washburn, deceased, had conveyed the land to him by deed of 25 Nov. 1785, and he had conveyed it to Abner Nelson.

        [59] Plymouth County Land Records, Vol. 89, p. 104.

        [60] Thatcher Papers, Vol. I: Haskins.

        [61] Email of Diana M. Fisher, 2000, cemetery transcriptions from Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville.

        [62] Mitchell, Nahum, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater, in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, Boston, 1840, reprint, Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1983, [hereinafter Mitchell, History of Bridgewater], p. 326, says he had James, Amos Luther, Joshua, and perhaps others.

        [63] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 143.

        [64] Email of Diana M. Fisher, 2000, cemetery transcriptions from Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville.

        [65] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 147.

        [66] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 1, p. 292.

        [67] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, p. 326.

        [68] Plymouth County Probate Vol. 34, p. 15.

        [69] Bris­tol County Land Records, Vol. 80, p. 462.

        [70] Wood, Middleboro Deaths, p. 220.

        [71] Plym­outh County Probate Docket #22006; Vol. 46, p. 132; Vol. 47, p. 482; Vol. 49, p. 378.

        [72] Calculated from her age at death.

        [73] Thatcher Papers, Vol. III: Washburn.

        [74] Calculated from her age at death.

        [75] Thatcher Papers, Vol. III: Washburn.

        [76] Per his gravestone.

        [77] Wood, Middleboro Deaths, p. 220.

        [78] Email of Diana M. Fisher, 2000, cemetery transcriptions from Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville.

        [79] 1830 Federal Census, Middleborough, Plymouth Co., MA, p. 237, the Amos Washburn household had 1 male aged 50-59 years, 1 female aged 40-49 years, 1 female aged 50-59 years, and 2 females aged 60-69 years.

        [80] 1840 Federal Census, Middleborough, Plymouth Co., MA, p. 67, the Amos Washburn household had 1 male aged 50-59 years [sic], 3 females aged 60-69 years, and 1 female aged 70-79 years, and had 1 person engaged in agriculture.

        [81] 1850 Federal Census, Middleborough, Plymouth Co., MA, p. 195, dwelling #12, family #15:

                Amos Washburn, 75, male, farmer, $1700, born MA

                Prudence Washburn, 65, female, born MA

        [82] Middleborough VRs, Vol. 2, pp. 170, 213; Taunton VRs, Vol. 2, p. 497, married in the Lakeville and Taunton Precinct Congregational Church.

        [83] Calculated from his age at death.

        [84] Per her gravestone.

        [85] Email of Diana M. Fisher, 2000, cemetery transcriptions from Thompson Hill Cemetery in Lakeville.



[A] The Will of Joshua Waterman of Middleborough, Massachusetts (1797): *

In the Name of God Amen.—This sixteenth day of January in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred ninety & seven. I Joshua Waterman of Middleborough in the County of Plymouth & Comwealth of Massachusetts yeoman, being of perfect mind & memory, blessed be God therefor, calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make & ordain this my last will & testament, that is to say, principally & first of all; I give & recommend my soul into ye hands of God that gave it, and my body to the earth to be buried in decent christian burial at the discretion of my Executrix, nothing doubting but at the general resurrection, I shall recieve the same again by mighty power of God; as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, demise & dispose of the same in the following manner – vizt.–

Item—I Give & bequeath to my well beloved wife Hannah Waterman, one third of the improvement of all my Interest so long as she shall remain my widow, and one third of my indoor moveables during life

Item—I Give & bequeath to my Daughter Patience Cobb; the wife of Isaac Cobb Forty four dollars, to be paid by my Executrix, to her & heirs forever ~

Item—I Give & bequeath to my Daughter Bethiah Waterman, one Bed & furniture; also Two Hundred Dollars, to be paid by my Executrix; and a privilege of living in my house, so long as she shall remain unmarried – the estate I have given her, to be hers & heirs, forever—

Item—I Give and bequeath to my three sons vizt– Joshua  Waterman – Joseph Waterman & Jonah Waterman, my wearing apparell & arms, and all my other estate that I have not yet disposed of, to be equally divided between them, my funeral charges & just debts being first paid, to them & heirs forever.~

Item—And, I do constitute and appoint my well beloved wife Hannah Waterman, Executrix to this my last will & testament, thus hoping that this my last will & testament will be kept & performed, according to the true intent & meaning hereof. – In witness whereof, I the said Joshua Waterman have hereunto set my hand and seal, the day & year before mentioned.~

Signed Sealed, Published & deliv-

ered to be the last will & testamt.                                                                                     Joshua Waterman                            (seal)

by ye sd Joshua Waterman, in Presence

of us 

                John Tinkham

                Melzar Tribou

                Joseph Tinkham

 

Probated on 9 Nov. 1801, and proved by John Tinkham and Melzar Tribou, two of the witnesses.

 

* Transcribed by John A. Maltby from Plymouth County Probate Vol. 37, p. 509-510, from FHL microfilm #0550719.